Music and the Gospel: “Alaska,” 1st Sunday of Advent

This week’s Spirit is about waking up to what is happening in the world around us. It is easy to put off unpleasant issues and can be challenging to convince others of a problem we see. Maggie Rogers’ song “Alaska” is about taking a challenging path alone, sometimes without the people we love, and moving forward with our eyes wide open.

Key lines: I was walking through icy streams / That took my breath away / Moving slowly through westward water / Over glacial plains / And I walked off you / And I walked off an old me / Oh me oh my I thought it was a dream / So it seemed / And now, breathe deep

Questions: What issues or problems do you recognize in your school or community? What woke you up to the issue? How did the problem touch you? When have you been asleep to a situation or issue that mattered to others? How can you help people around you wake up to issues important to you?

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Music and the Gospel: “Go As You Are,” Curtis Harding, 31st Sunday Ordinary Time

Our first impressions are often stereotypes. We make assumptions based on people’s appearance, how they talk, and how they act. We have to look beyond what our eyes see. The song “Go As You Are” reminds us to keep our eyes open to see who the people we encounter day by day really are.

Key lines: Everyone’s got a story / With no reason for all the rhyme / We fall just a few pounds of glory / I can’t justify all the time / But, go as you are / Just don’t come back the same / If you don’t get too far / You’ve got no one to blame

Questions: What stereotypes exist in your school and community? When has someone stereotyped you? How did this make you feel? When have you made an embarrassing assumption about someone? What happened as a consequence of this assumption? How did you fix it?

Music and the Gospel: “Here For You,” Kygo ft. Ella Henderson, 30th Sunday Ordinary Time

“Love your neighbor as yourself.” Jesus teaches us the way to love God is to love one another. It doesn’t matter who we love, what religion we adhere to, what color our skin is, where we are on the economic scale. What matters the most is that we treat each other with respect, fairness, and kindness. The song “Here For You” is a promise to always stand by each other in the face of ignorance. We owe it to ourselves and our neighbors to be there for each other. In doing this, we create a safe community for all.

Key lines: When you feel you’ve had enough, and you wasted all your love / I’ll be here for you, here for you / When the dog is at his bone, and you run away from home / I’ll be here for you, here for you / Well I’m here for you, I’m here for you, you, you

Questions: What types of disrespect do you see in your school, community, country? What do you think can be done to challenge people who like to exclude others? When have you showed mercy to someone who wronged you? When has someone shown you mercy?

Music and the Gospel: “One Of Us,” New Politics, 28th Sunday Ordinary Time

Immigration is a fiery topic today. Some people welcome immigrants; some resist others different from them. This week’s SPIRIT explores how accepting new people and cultures can benefit our communities and schools and expand our relationships with those around us. The song “One of Us” is about celebrating our differences and accepting people into our homes, communities, and lives.

Key lines: Everybody needs a place to call their home / Everybody’s skin is different, not their bones / Even when you’re lonely, know you’re not alone / You’re one of us, one of us, one of us / One of us / Bring the sunshine in / The happy days / The hardship, too / We’ll find a way / So raise your flag / One last time / Before the day is through, I promise you / That we will laugh about it all / And we’ll celebrate the things we’ve done for years to come / ‘Cause that’s what friends, that’s what friends are for

Questions: What challenges do you think immigrants face in new places? What challenges have you faced if you are an immigrant? What do you think helps ease these challenges? What have you learned from people of different cultures? Who do you notice being excluded in your community?